Jan 032012
 

Back in June, I had the pleasure of meeting and working with Ben Long at The Oklahoma Summer Arts Institute workshops.  In addition to his work with many magazines such as MacWeek, MacUser, Macworld, and CreativePro.com, Ben is also a regular contributor to lynda.com, an award winning online instructional video library.

lynda.com produces thousands of video tutorials and training on various topics.  While most of their video’s feature courses on software, they have been working towards focusing on where creativity and technology intersect.  Some of their latest videos are aimed at educating not just the practical aspects of a given discipline, but the artistic understanding and creative vision that can be applied.

Ben Long’s Foundations of Photography series has been a huge success with lynda.com, addressing technical knowledge of photography with an understanding of the aesthetics of it as well.  Following our work together during the summer at Quartz mountain, Ben and I were reunited for fall courses at The Oklahoma Arts Institute.  The folks at lynda.com took the opportunity to incorporate the workshop into a new course Ben was working on for the site,  Foundations of Photography: Composition.  We were followed by a camera crew who filmed our lectures on creativity, intuition and seeing, as well as critiques and discussions with the students.

This was such a new and fantastic project to work on, and it was wonderful to work with Ben and everyone from lynda.com.  The Foundations of Photography: Composition video series was published on lynda.com on 12-23-11 and has already been a huge success, highlighting as one of the most viewed courses.  I highly encourage anyone interested to check out the series, you won’t be disappointed!

Oct 182011
 

Just added a handful of new images to the portfolio section of the website!

I’ve continued working with the mirrors in color, most recently playing with gels to have more control over the color and how it defines the form.  The color has brought a more dynamic element to the images, and the colors I’ve begun incorporating have been slightly more bold than they were previously.

Check out the 2010-present section at ConnieImboden.com to see some of the latest work!

 October 18, 2011  Posted by at 7:35 pm Latest Images Tagged with: , , ,  No Responses »
Aug 252009
 


Another excellent review! This is for the show at The University of Maine Museum of Art in Bangor, ME. The show looks fantastic by the way and will be up through September 19, 2009. For more information on the show, click here.

I’m thrilled to receive this wonderful review from Carl Little in Art New England Magazine, featured in the August/September issue:

Elegant Darkness: Photographs by Connie Imboden

“Black-and-white, when its full potential is realized, renders all other colors unnecessary,” the painter Wolf Kahn one wrote about Emily Nelligan’s charcoal drawings, The same can be said of the photographs of Connie Imboden. While the Baltimore-based artist has explored color in her recent years, the twenty pieces in Elegant Darkness, dating from 1987 to 2005, offer a rich palette, with tones ranging from silvery white to pitch black.

Imboden’s stature as a world-class photographer is based on her compelling images of bodies transformed by water. Over the years she has explored the intersection of physical form and liquid medium. In her photographs, torsos, limbs, and visages stretch and twist into new configurations that are often gorgeous and frequently disturbing.

In a number of pieces, we witness Ovid-like metamorphoses. In Untitled 6243, for example, a male figure appears to be turning into (or emerging from) driftwood. At times, the makeover seems cruel: the face in Untitled 9053 undergoes a torturous rearrangement by way of a metal contraption right out of an S&M accessory catalogue. In each case, it is the H20 that creates the illusion.

The nineteen silver gelatin prints and one archival inkjet print in the exhibition bring to mind diverse artists and aesthetics. Earlier pieces, such as Sainthood and Visceral Thoughts (both 1987), might be stills from a Jean Cocteau film, where disembodied heads surreally float in a watery landscape. Just as we read labia in the folds of Georgia O’Keeffe’s flowers, so the viewer may connect the fleshy snail shape in Untitled 8067 to something sexual. The diving figure in Untitled 1721 recalls the paintings of Lorraine Shemesh, who shares Imboden’s fascination with the distortions that occur when a figure moves through water.

The exhibition was organized to mark the recent publication of Imboden’s Reflections: 25 Years of Photography (Insight Editons, 2009). A long-time professor at the Maryland Institute College of Art and the Maine Media Workshop, the artist has earned this retrospective treatment through a commitment to investigating the exquisite mysteries of the human form.


-Carl Little

Feb 092009
 

March 14 – April 25, 2009

Opening Reception & Book Signing: March 14, 2009
Reception begins at 6pm

Book signing begins at 5pm, and will be featuring the new book,
“Reflections: 25 Years of Photography by Connie Imboden”

Here’s the gallery info:

Heineman Myers Contemporary Art
4728 Hampden Lane
Bethesda, MD 20814
www.heinemanmyers.com
301-951-7900

Click on the logo above to visit heinemanmyers.com : )

Oct 272007
 

With the new site up and running (www.ConnieImboden.com), I would like to use this blog site as a more informal way to share my process, experiences, recent developments, works in progress, and the latest news, both inside and outside the life of my work.

So, to kick off the new blog, I’d like to begin by introducing my very talented puppy, Lucy. She is the most recent addition to the family, and judging by this video, we think she’ll fit right in. Enjoy!

 October 27, 2007  Posted by at 3:54 pm Tagged with: ,  No Responses »