Nov 012017
 

Visit the Sistine Chapel…..

I was in Rome recently and was anxious to revisit the Sistine Chapel. I had a “skip the line” tour (with Context Tours – excellent! I highly recommend them) so the wait was only about 30 minutes. The walk through the Vatican museums was wonderful but once we got even near the Sistine Chapel the mass of people started growing. By the time we entered the Chapel we were in a sea of people – stuffed! Elbow to elbow or in my case their elbow to my head. We could barely move – I am not exaggerating. I was so afraid of losing Patricia that we literally held onto each other. It was that close. Tring to elevate myself above the situation, I began staining my neck to view what I had been anticipating for so long. I was being drawn in to the paintings when a red plastic bag knocked into my face (it was empty so no harm done) but then the loud speaker came on admonishing us for talking because “THIS WAS A SACRED SPACE!” in several different languages, every 15 minutes. The circumstances were too much for me to overcome. I was moved along by the sea until I was out the other end, utterly exhausted and seriously disappointed.

I am not and have never been a fan of the Catholic Church but I found this experience to really show their colors. This chapel is truly a sacred space, with figures sculpted out of paint, the ceiling transformed by paint and most importantly infused with the complex extremes of the human condition – literally ecstasy to agony. But the experience is completely ruined because of greed – packing into the space as many people as could fit (like being crammed into a Japanese subways.) They could have taken a page from the Peruvians who severely limit the number of people that can visit Machu Picchu a day enabling the experience to be full and enriching. Besides which, it cannot be good for the paintings with all this carbon dioxide being pumped in the air by the sea of visitors.

It reminded me of a recent trip to Bejing and the Great Wall where the crowds walking on the wall were so dense you couldn’t see space between the people. The Great Wall, built in the 15th Century, was not designed to have thousands of people a day walking on it and the Sistine Chapel, built in the late 15th century, was not designed to be used as a commercial business.

Perhaps the real miracle of this experience is that, in spite of all this, I actually WAS deeply affected by the Sistine Chapel paintings! I didn’t realize it until I got back to my studio. Looking at my work with the recent experience with Michelangelo, I decided to make a radical change in my approach to shooting in the mirrors. It might be viewed by outsiders as an insignificant one – but to me it is monumental!

Ready for it?

Instead of focusing on the surface of the mirrors I am now starting to focus on the figures!

Mind-blowing!

More on this later….

 November 1, 2017  Posted by at 2:48 pm Uncategorized No Responses »
Jul 172017
 
Reflection on my Nord Photography workshop - 2017

I do believe that Norway is one of the most beautiful places on earth.  The light is special.  I am writing this from Provincetown – known for its gorgeous and spectacular light that Joel Meyerowitz so beautifully articulated in his book Cape Light.  Norway’s light has a similar luminosity, and a clarity that makes me […]

 July 17, 2017  Posted by at 11:49 am Workshops No Responses »
Feb 082017
 
Baltimore Magazine, February 2017

As the exhibition at Y:ART approached, press and publicity was building and we seemed to be getting a lot of great media coverage. I was thrilled with so much of the attention we received in print, online, and even on public broadcast through MPT, all of which generated a lot of interest and attendance at the […]

 February 8, 2017  Posted by at 12:40 pm Publications No Responses »
Feb 022017
 
New Work in 2017

2016 ended with such a bang, it’s now February and I’m STILL working on a “Year in Review” blog post to try to summarize the immense creative growth, productivity, and excitement that came with it. Everything in the last year has motivated me to keep working, to continue pushing the envelope of the ever-evolving creative […]

 February 2, 2017  Posted by at 4:00 pm Latest Images, Portfolio No Responses »
Nov 162016
 
"Conversations" with Bmore Art

BmoreArt, the award-winning Baltimore online journal, has done a wonderful job documenting the art community and evolved to engage a broad local and global audience. As Baltimore’s cultural scene has grown and gained momentum, they launched a podcast series in 2015 to dive further into the arts community. “Conversations” brings insightful and in depth audio interviews with local […]

 November 16, 2016  Posted by at 12:02 pm Publications No Responses »
Nov 012016
 
MPT ArtWorks Episode 507: Connie Reflects on her Art

Last Thursday, MPT ArtWorks aired Episode 507, highlighting their theme on “Photographers”. I could not be more thrilled with their segment on yours truly, which featured an in-studio visit and interview with my dear friend Rhea Feikin. I thought the images looked great, and Rhea’s thoughtful questions focused on core aspects of my work and process that I was […]

 November 1, 2016  Posted by at 2:00 pm Exhibitions, Lectures, and Appearances 1 Response »
Aug 252016
 
NORDPhotography Workshops 2016 Review

Last month, I had the opportunity to teach a workshop in Norway with NORDphotography entitled “The Nude As Form”, and I loved every minute of it. Upon arriving, my dear friend Jill Enfield was on her way out after teaching a workshop the week before mine. We arranged to meet up for coffee at the airport […]

 August 25, 2016  Posted by at 1:53 pm Travel, Workshops No Responses »
May 232016
 
Juniper Workshops Online Critique

On Sunday, May 22, Juniper Workshops featured a webinar with Ben Long and myself using WebEx conferencing technology to create a virtual classroom for hosting an in depth photo critique session. Although I’ve previously tutored students one-on-one using FaceTime, Skype, and Dropbox, this was the first time I’ve met with a group over the internet to […]